Google, Social Media Firms, Others Halt Office Return Plan

Giant firms in the digital technology sector are altering their return-to-work plans for employees, as Covid-19 cases rise in the US, saying that the staff must be vaccinated before working in the office.

This is according to different announcements made by these firms.
Google announced that it would delay a return to the office until 18 October and joined Facebook in saying it would require US workers returning to the office to be vaccinated.

In a statement, Twitter said it would pause office re-opening, closing offices in San Francisco and New York once again. The two Twitter offices had been operating at up to 50% capacity for staff who wanted to return. The company said it remained committed to giving employees the option to work from home where possible.

In a similar news, other tech firms have also put back, or changed, return-to-work plans. Apple has reportedly delayed a planned return to on-site working until October.
Also, Amazon has previously announced a three-day-a-week return to work for “corporate” staff, in a seeming shift of policy.

The reason behind rescheduling of plan comes as the US administration struggles with flagging rates of vaccination. It is should be remember that, President Biden recently ordered two million federal employees to show proof of vaccination or be subject to mandatory testing and mask-wearing.

Many tech firms have followed similar stance. In an email to all employees on late last week, Google chief executive Sundar Pichai said the firm would extend a global, voluntary, work-from-home policy through to 18 October.

It added that anyone coming to work on thier campuses will need to be vaccinated. The policy which will started in the US will be rolled out to other regions, soon.

In a similar stance, Facebook also announced that it US staff returning to offices will be required to be vaccinated.

They all said their priority is the health safety of their staff.

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